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A study of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy among tribal women at tertiary level care in bastar chhattisgarh

Authors: Prabha Chauhan, Teeku Sinha, Praveen Shrivastava, Vinod Kumar Singh Chauhan
Int J Biol Med Res. 2014; 5(2): 4075-4083  |  PDF File

Abstract

Abstract Background: Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy (Eclamptic and Noneclamptic) have been documented since ancient times. Pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH), Preeclampsia and Eclampsia are well-known disorders associated with the increased risk of maternal and fetal complications. It is often discussed in the research literatures of the world that the incidence of Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy (Eclamptic and Noneclamptic) is on the decline in developed world, but it is still a threat in developing countries particularly in rural and tribal area. AIM: The primary objective is to determine incidence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy among tribal and nontribal women of Bastar Chattisgarh and to discuss recommendations for reducing the risk of Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Objectives: The primary objective is:- (i) To determine incidence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy among tribal and nontribal women of Bastar Chhattisgarh and (ii) To discuss recommendations for reducing the risk of Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Materials and Methods: This is a hospital based, retrospective study of all available records of the patients that were admitted in indoor wards and managed in Obstetrics and gynecology Department Late Shri Bali Ram Kashyp Memorial Medical College, Jagdalpur, Bastar, Chattisgarh, between July 2007 and Dec. 2012. Results: Overall incidence of Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy was 7.6%, including incidence 4.860 % of pre-eclampsia, 0.993 % of eclampsia and 1.744 % of pregnancy induced hypertension. On further stratification it is revealed that among tribal total incidence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy is 6.974 and among women of nontribal background incidence is 0.625. Strategies to prevent these morbidity and mortality have been discussed in detail in discussion section. Conclusion: Evidence in this study suggest that among tribal women total incidence of Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) is much higher and maximum cases were in 20-25 years of early age group, primigravid/nullipara and those in preterm gestation. Morbidity and mortality associated with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are the most difficult to prevent. A well structured research work is needed for assessment of interventions designed to reduce the risk of Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy with particular emphasis among tribal high risk group.