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Prevalence of hbv, hcv and hiv-1, 2 infections among blood donors in prince rashed ben al-hassan hospital in north region of jordan

Authors:Fethi Abed ALGani
Int J Biol Med Res. 2011; 2(4): 912 - 916  |  PDF File

Abstract

Objectives: To study the sero prevalence rate of hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among blood donors in the north region of Jordan. Several infectious diseases are transmitted by blood transfusion, especially viral infections. The most common blood-transmitted viruses are hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). These viruses cause fatal, chronic and life-threatening disorders. The prevalence of these viruses varies by nationality and geography. The purpose of this study was to establish the current prevalence of hepatitis viruses (B and C) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus HIV-1, 2 among blood donors at Prince Rashed Ben Al-Hassan Hospital in north region of Jordan. Setting: A retrospective study carried out at Prince Rashed Ben Al-Hassan Hospital in north region of jordan over Three years period. Methods: Serological markers of HBV, HCV and HIV 1, 2 were studied in 8190 (7800 males and 390 females), using commercially available kits, over a period of 3 years from January 2006 to December 2009 at at Prince Rashed Ben Al-Hassan Hospital in north region of Jordan, Irbid . The prevalence of confirmed-positive test results of these viruses was evaluated among different gender and ages. Results: During the study period, prevalence rates of HBV and HCV infections were 1.4% and 0.8%, and zero for HIV infections. The prevalence was not significantly higher in male than in female donors. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and anti-HCV positivity tend to increase with increase in age. Conclusions: This study highlights the prevalence rates of HBV and HCV among different groups. The prevalence varies from one group to another, being the lowest among young donors. Therefore, extensive recruitment of young donors should help ensure a long-term increase in the blood supply. Specific measures should be implemented to reduce such risks. These may include specific programs for medical education, a meticulous infection control system in the hospitals, a registry program and clinical follow-up for patients positive for HCV and HBV.