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A study of effect of stress on voluntary alcohol intake in wistar rats on behavioral changes

Authors:Balida Mallikarjuna Rao, M. Chandrashekar, sanghishetti Vijay Prasad, Nilesh N. Kate, Ambareesha.kondam, M. Suresh
Int J Biol Med Res. 2012; 3(2): 1612- 1615  |  PDF File

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Intake of alcohol in many animals’ species depends on numerous genetic and environmental factors. One of the major factors that can affect alcohol intake is stress. Stress has long been thought to influence the initiation and maintenance of alcohol drinking in humans. Alcohol drinking procedure in Wistar rats was used and was compared with different ethanol concentration along with behavioral assessments. The experiment was carried out with 24 healthy Wistar rats. The animals were randomly divided into four groups of 6 animals each. Group – I (non alcoholic): Control Group, which consists of 6 animals were randomly divided into 3 sub groups of 2 animals. Each sub group was given only tap water, then after 3 weeks, behavioral assessment was done by open field apparatus for central Peripheral ambulation, grooming, rearing and immobilization. Group – II alcoholic group consists of alcohol fed 6 animals were randomly divided into 3 sub groups of 2 animals. Each sub group was given tap water and 5%, 20% and 40%, ethyl alcohol solution about 3 weeks. Group – III it is also alcoholic group consists of alcohol fed 6 animals were randomly divided into 3 sub groups of 2 animals. Each sub group was given tap water and 5%, 20% and 40%, ethyl alcohol solution about 3 weeks. Stress was applied after deprivation and the consumption of alcohol was assessed. Group – IV it is a Preference group consists of 6 animals, were randomly divided into 3 sub groups of 2 animals. Each sub group was given tap water and 5%, 20% and 40%, ethyl alcohol solution for about 3 weeks. The behavior was assessed before and after stress effect. Stress led to a significant increase (p<0.05) in alcohol intake in Wister rats. After stress, however, their preference for the 20% alcohol solution was increased. Repeated swim stress caused an increase in alcohol intake and they responded to behavioral changes before and after stress. This study reveals the effect of alcohol deprivation and stress on the drinking behavior at different concentration with specific or non specific preference groups with its behavioral modulations. Wister rats differentially respond to and stress. In these animals alcohol drinking is an attempt to cope with stress.